New Women of the New South
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New Women of the New South : The Leaders of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the Southern States

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There is currently a great deal of interest in the Southern suffrage movement, but until now historians have had no comprehensive history of the woman suffrage movement in the South, the region where suffragists had the hardest fight and the least success. This important new book focuses on eleven of the movement's most prominent leaders at the regional and national levels, exploring the range of opinions within this group, with particular emphasis on race and states' rights. Wheeler insists that the suffragists were motivated primarily by the desire to secure public affirmation of female equality and to protect the interests of women, children, and the poor in the tradition of noblesse oblige in a New South they perceived as misgoverned by crass and materialistic men. A vigorous suffrage movement began in the South in the 1890s, however, because suffragists believed offering woman suffrage as a way of countering black voting strength gave them an "expediency" argument that would succeed-even make the South lead the nation in the adoption of woman suffrage. When this strategy failed, the movement flagged, until the Progressive Movement provided a new rationale for female enfranchisement. Wheeler also emphasizes the relationship between the Northern and Southern leaders, which was one of mutual influence. This pioneering study of the Southern suffrage movement will be essential to students of the history of woman suffrage, American women, the South, the Progressive Era, and American reform movements.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 320 pages
  • 152.4 x 223.52 x 17.78mm | 453.59g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • 0195082451
  • 9780195082456

Review quote

"Wheeler has succeeded admirably in her purposes of bringing about a deeper understanding of the southern suffrage leaders and their role in the American woman sufferage movement."-The Journal of Southwest Georgia History "Marjorie Spruill Wheeler has written a long-needed account of the southern suffrage movement....This thoughtful and analytical book offers the general reader as well as the scholar the first comprehensive history of an important period in the history of southern women."-West Virginia History "Adds an important synthesis to the study of the southern Woman Suffrage movement....Well written, the book is satisfying to the reader and adds much information to the study of what were (and in some cases still are) the profound paradoxes of the region."-Atlanta History "Wheeler's work breaks new ground in southern and suffrage studies."-American Studies "Elegantly written, thoroughly documented, and well-argued....Using her superb skills as a historian (and a fine storyteller), Wheeler has woven together a compelling history of the woman suffrage movement in the South. New Women of the New South is an excellent book and an important addition to the expanding field of southern women's history."-The North Carolina Historical Review "This long-awaited study is an important synthesis of the women suffrage movement in the South...It is a must for all students of women's or southern history."-Register of the Kentucky Historical Society "Marjorie Spruill Wheeler makes a valuable contribution toward understanding the interplay of race, class, and gender in the southern woman's suffrage campaign as it unfolded from 1890 to 1920....Wheeler contributes significantly to the history of the suffrage movement..."- Tennessee Historical Quarterly "Many books are chosen, but few actually reshape our thinking about the South. Amid the wealth of worthy texts, there remains a dearth of imaginative, innovative studies, especially of women's experience throughout the southern states. Marjorie Spruill Wheeler's book is precisely that. She teaches us to see the South anew, and she brings a bounty of fresh evidence and confident interpretation to a subject sorely in need of regional and comparative evaluation....What Wheeler achieves is extraordinary. She compels us to grasp the connections between women across the South, and she provides us with hypotheses about southern women's experience all scholars of the South can examine with profit."-Southern Quarterly "New Women of the New South is well researched, well argued, and well written and will prove a useful monograph for students in undergraduate classes in southern and women's history."-Georgia Historical Quarterly "This book is the first to examine comprehensively the strategy and objectives of the [woman suffrage] movement in the South as a whole....[This] well-written volume places the Virginia Equal Suffrage league in a wider regional and national context and as such should find a place on the shelves of all libraries whose collections include materials on the history of women, reform, twentieth-century politics, and the southern United States."-Virginia Librarian "Marjorie Spruill Wheeler sets her compelling portraits of white suffrage leaders in the complex racial and sexual politics of both the New South and the national suffrage movement. This study assures that future historians of women and politics in the U.S. will have to reckon with the South, recognizing the centrality of states' rights, southern strategies, and a broad range of racial (including racist) views to the battle for women's rights in America."-Nancy A. Hewitt, Duke University "Wheeler's research has uncovered a gold mine in Southern women's papers. Her clear-eyed, subtle investigation should regenerate interest in the woman suffrage movement by attending to the class, race, and regional dynamics of it."-Nancy F. Cott, Yale University "Marjorie Spruill Wheeler introduces us here to a remarkable group of women. This engaging and pioneering account will recast the way we think about the South in which these women lived and the Souths that have followed."-Edward L. Ayers, Author of Promise of the New South "This carefully researched study adds a large and significant new dimension to the history of the American suffrage movement, and throws new light on the politics of the New South."-Anne Firor Scott, Author of Natural Allies: Woman's Associations in American History "A much-needed and more inclusive treatment of the women's suffrage movement. Wheeler suggests one reason the Southern experience has been largely ignored by historians is that it was unsuccessful and therefore perceived as insignificant. Her careful examination of the very conditions that made it unsuccessful, though, is what makes this account so intriguing."-Roanoke Times & World News "This study adds rich detail and dimensions to Progressive Era accounts. It is especially welcome to those of us who teach in the South classes composed primarily of women who need to know their own past."-Marth H. Swain, Texas Women's University "This vibrant study...answers some of the key questions concerning late-nineteenth-century feminism. Her volume is invaluable, not just because of how much it teaches us as scholars, but because it has the wit and accessibility to engage our students. The business of scholarship can be all too tedious, but Wheeler's book lightens our load by offering us a brisk, timely study which will doubtless enjoy a wide and enthusiastic readership."-Reviews in American Historyshow more

Back cover copy

There is currently a great deal of interest in the Southern suffrage movement, but until now historians have had no comprehensive history of the woman suffrage movement in the South, the region where suffragists had the hardest fight and the least success. This important new book focuses on eleven of the movement's most prominent leaders at the regional and national levels, exploring the range of opinions within this group, with particular emphasis on race and states' rights. Wheeler argues that the suffragists were motivated primarily by the desire to secure public affirmation of female equality and to protect the interests of women, children, and the poor in the tradition of noblesse oblige in a New South they perceived as misgoverned by crass and materialistic men. A vigorous suffrage movement began in the South in the 1890s, however, because suffragists believed offering woman suffrage as a way of countering black voting strength gave them an "expediency" argument that would succeed - even make the South lead the nation in the adoption of woman suffrage. When this strategy failed, the movement flagged until the Progressive Movement provided a new rationale for female enfranchisement. Wheeler also emphasizes the relationship between the Northern and Southern leaders, which was one of mutual influence. This pioneering study of the Southern suffrage movement will be essential to students of the history of woman suffrage, American women, the South, the Progressive Era, and American reform movements.show more

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