A New Universal Gazetteer, Containing a Description of the Principal Nations, Empires, Kingdoms, States; Of the Known World ...

A New Universal Gazetteer, Containing a Description of the Principal Nations, Empires, Kingdoms, States; Of the Known World ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...of the levant or East Indies. Holland is said to have derived its name from the vast and thick forests of wood with which it was at one time covered; Holtlant, in German, signifying woodland. In the middle ages it was governed by its counts or earls; in the 15th century it became subject to the house of Burgundy; it passed afterwards to Austria; and finally joined the other provinces that declared for independence. On the invasion of Holland by the French, in the beginning of 1795, the stadtholder with his family took refuge in England. Holland was subsequently under various forms of the French domination. At length the people became weary of this connexion. The events of 1813 had weakened the power that bound them; the people rose; their fetters were broken; and a provisional government was formed at Amster dam on the 18th of November. William Frederick, of Nassau and Orange, landed from England at the close of the same month, entered Amsterdam on the 2nd of December, and was proclaimed Sovereign Prince of the United Netherlands, which had formerly been subject to the dukes of Burgundy, were re-united under the prince of Orange, as William I., king of the Netherlands, and these countries continued under one government till 1830. For an account of the revolution of that year, See Netherlands. Holland, a strong town of E. Prussia, seated near the river Weeske, 14 m. S. S.E. ofElbing. Holland, JVew, an island of the South 1 iicific Ocean, and the largest known land that does not bear the name of a continent. It extends from 100. to 153. E. long., and from 11. to 3lJ. S. lat., or 2,730 m. from W. to E., and 1,960 from N. to S. When this vast island was first discovered is uncertain. The Portuguese and Spaniards appear to have visited it in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 920 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 46mm | 1,610g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236824032
  • 9781236824035