New Physiognomy, Or, Signs of Character; As Manifested Through Temperament and External Forms, and Especially in "The Human Face Divine"

New Physiognomy, Or, Signs of Character; As Manifested Through Temperament and External Forms, and Especially in "The Human Face Divine"

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...of certain types at certain periods--these types being intended to subserve great moral purposes, and to continue, as in the undoubted case of the Jews, until these purposes were fulfilled. The author concluded by remarking that the analogy of space and time, as revealed by astronomy and geology, favored the belief j that nothing could spring up by chance; but that fixed principles, established and guided by an unseen hand, pervaded every interstice of the organic and inorganic creations. The chairman of the meeting, Mr. John Crawford, expressed the belief that the great mass of the people of England were British, and not Teutonic. Dr. Knox defended his wellknown theory, that in ethnology race is everything. He was convinced that an element not mentioned by the author of the paper--the Phoenician element--was very prevalent in Cornwall, Devon, and the south of Ireland. Mr. Robert Chambers supported the views of the author of the paper by stating instances in which physical peculiarities have been perpetuated in families--the lip of the house of Hapsburg, for instance. He referred to his own Fig. 512. Jutian Man. family and to the descendants of the brother of Sir William Wallace. He believed that types, after being apparently lost, frequently re-emerge. Mr. Wright pointed out the great necessity for caution in making a minute classification of types. He believed that the customs of the middle ages favored the perpetuation of' family characteristics in certain districts. Mr. Luke Burke fully admitted the existence of the various types so ably described by the author of the paper, but contended that these types were not the result of lineal descent from Celtic and Teutonic tribes, but were produced through a combination of organic and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236572971
  • 9781236572974