A New and Literal Translation of Juvenal and Persius; With Explanatory Notes in Which These Difficult Satirists Are Rendered Easy and Familiar to Th

A New and Literal Translation of Juvenal and Persius; With Explanatory Notes in Which These Difficult Satirists Are Rendered Easy and Familiar to Th

By (author) 

List price: US$18.51

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1807 edition. Excerpt: ... by the difference you make between them and yourself when you invite tbem to supper. Do this. Consult the rules of civility, and then you will accommodate yourself to the condition of your guests...... 113. Be, as many now are, 6fc When you snp alone, then, as many are, be--dives tibi, i. e. fare as expensively and Mb satnptn 115 And accustomed to penetrate the drain of the Suburra. ear: I would say a few words to himself, if he would lend an easy Nobody seeks, what were sent to his mean friends By Seneca; what good Piso, what Cotta used To bestow: for, than both titles and offices, formerly, 110 Greater was the glory of giving esteemed: only We ask that you would sup civilly: do this, and be, Be (as many now are) rich to yourself, poor to your friends. Before himself (is placed) the liver of a great goose: equal to geese, A crammed fowl, and, worthy the spear of yellow Meleager, 115 Smokes a boar: after him truffles are scraped, if then ously as you please; spare no expense to gratify yourseif. But when you invite your poor friends, then fare as they do: if you treat them as poor and mean, so treat yourself, that you and they may be upon the same footing--thus be pauper amicis. q. d. This is all we ask; we don't require of you the munificence of Seneca, Piso, Cotta, or any of those great and generous patrons, who esteemed a service done, or a kindness bestowed, on their poor friends, beyond the glory of titles of nobility, or of high offices in the state; this, perhaps, might be going too far--therefore, we desire no more, than that, when you invite us, you would treat us ci. villy at least, if not sumptuously; fare as we fare, and we shall be content. This little apostrophe to Virro contains a humourous, and, at the same time, a sharp...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 166 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 308g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236634128
  • 9781236634122