New Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle; Annotated by Thomas Carlyle and Ed. by Alexander Carlyle, with an Introduction by Sir James Crichton-Browne with Sixteen Illustrations

New Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle; Annotated by Thomas Carlyle and Ed. by Alexander Carlyle, with an Introduction by Sir James Crichton-Browne with Sixteen Illustrations

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...is become of it!!--I have never heard a word out of his head about it, except to say once, "I suppose my money will have gone in the crash, and poor Butler (the gentleman who invested it for him) will be very sorry!"--Being a Philosopher's Wife has some advantages!--I never think about money myself; beyond what serves my daily needs; but if he weren't of the same mind, I might be made sufficiently uncomfortable about it. And now, good luck to you. Remember me to them all. I owe your Sister-in-law a Letter, which she shall get some day. Yours affectionately, Jane W. Carlyle. LETTER 182 To Mrs. Russell, ThornhiU. Chelsea, Saturday night, 16 January, 1858. Dearest Mary--There never was woman had better chance at writing (except that my head is far from clear) than I have this Winter evening. For I am alone in the house, --as utterly alone as I ever felt at Craigen puttock with Mr. C. gone over into Annandale! The difference is, that Mr. C. is gone not to Annandale, but to the Grange; and that my servant instead of being too uncouth to talk with, is too ill-tempered. The very dog had a bilious attack overnight, and has lain all day in a stupor! I think I told you in my last, that both of us (I mean Mr. C. and I) were going to the Grange for a short time. And very little pleasure was I taking in the prospect. The same houseful of visitors; the same elaborate apparatus for living; and the life of the whole thing gone out of it! acting a sort of Play of the Past, with the principal Part suppressed, obliterated by the stern hand of Death! I didn't see at all how I was going to get through with the visit! when, lo! my Husband's friends "the Destinies" cut me out of all that difficulty, by laying me down in Influenza. When the day came, Mr. C. had to write...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236681932
  • 9781236681935