A New Industry; Or Raising the Angora Goat, and Mohair, for Profit. Embracing the Historical, Commercial, and Practical Features of the Industry ...

A New Industry; Or Raising the Angora Goat, and Mohair, for Profit. Embracing the Historical, Commercial, and Practical Features of the Industry ...

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...a goat will substitute anything he can find and will survive. I have endeavored to be conservative in my calculation of increase, and have not estimated anything from does under two years of age, although many of them will breed when yearlings. I have taken eighty per cent. as a basis of increase notwithstand iing there will be at least one hundred per cent. of kids dropped counting the twins, provided a sufficient number of bucks are used, (one to fifty is enough to insure this) and there is no good reason why twenty per cent. should not be more than sufficient to cover all natural losses from death, accidents, and from carelessness in kidding. In the matter of shearing, I have used three pound per fleecein the table represented by the seven-eighth Angora, as a basis of yield, although it is not uncommon for flocks of this characteri to average four pounds, and even more. In the Mexican goat I have calculated on nothing until the three-fourthsi grade is reached and then I have figured on two pounds per fleece, and three pounds for the grades above. As to themarket value of mohair, I have been governed by the lowest prices that have ruled during the past fifty years, viz: 25 cents to 30 cents per pound, at which price the manufacturer can afford to pile up standard goods, and there is very little doubt but that the average value will range above my estimate rather than below it, during the ten years I have named. (See list of quotations since 1856 on page 144.) In value of mutton, I have been governed in the same conservative manner and have selected the reasonably low prices of $2.00 and $2.50 per head as my basis for sales, which is equivalent to about 2% cents and 3 cents per pound live weight, a much lower average than has been paid...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236958322
  • 9781236958327
  • 2,295,827