New Hospitals Needed in Greater New York; Recommendations by the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Association with a Report on Present Conditions and Future Needs

New Hospitals Needed in Greater New York; Recommendations by the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Association with a Report on Present Conditions and Future Needs

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...these two factors, from which it will be seen that at least one-fifth of the bed capacity of the city might be in excess of the number of patients, it will be seen that a computed excess of 609 beds for the Borough of Manhattan is not indicative at all of no need for more beds. It indicates rather that about 200 beds are needed, a conclusion which is verified by a closer study of the various districts of the city. Methods of Hospital Distribution. But before taking up a detailed study of the needs of the borough, we must consider how the bed capacity of any given section, district, or borough can best be distributed. Manifestly there are but two ways in which this can be done: (1) By building local hospitals of the size, ascertained by computation, required to meet the needs of the district. This is the method, so far as any policy at all has been pursued, upon which both municipal and private hospitals have hitherto proceeded. If a given district was seen to be in need of hospital accommodations, a hospital of-from 50 to 200 beds was at once erected. This method has its advantages, but it has also certain disadvantages over against the other method of distribution. Before considering the relative merits of this method, let us consider the other way of distributing the needed bed capacity of the borough. (2) A second method is by establishing ambulance stations in the district where a lack of bed capacity is shown; and then by building the additional beds required, not in the immediate neighborhood in which the lack of beds is indicated, but to one large general hospital which should supply the needs of the entire borough. By an ambulance station, as opposed to a local hospital on the one hand, or a general hospital on the other, we mean a small...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579607
  • 9781236579607