A New General Biographical Dictionary Projected and Partly Arranged by the Late REV. Hugh James Rose; In Twelve Volumes Volume 1

A New General Biographical Dictionary Projected and Partly Arranged by the Late REV. Hugh James Rose; In Twelve Volumes Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$21.21

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...jEthelbert, Eanbald, the friend and pupil of Alcuin, was raised to the vacant see, and immediately gratified his friend by sending him to Rome to obtain the pall at the hands of the sovereign pontiff Adrian I. In returning home, ne at Parma met with Charlemagne; and as he had already been at the French court on an important mission from jEthelbert, that enlightened prince was no stranger to his transcendent merit, and accordingly formed the design of retaining him. The noble charge of leading the literature of Charlemagne's extensive empire was a worthy object for Alcuin's ambition, and he was perhaps also swayed by the recollection of jEthelbert's parting words; and he therefore promised that, with the consent of his king and his diocesan, he would return to France. He remained, however, at the French court till 790, during which time he instructed Charles in rhetoric, dialectics, and astronomy (to the last of which sciences the king was especially partial), and contracted a lasting friendship with Agilbert, and Riculfus, afterwards archbishop of Mentz. He then returned to England, charged with the negotiation of an alliance between Charles and Offa of Mercia; and having obtained the permission of Eanbald and the usurper Ethelred to depart, we find him again at the court of Charlemagne in the winter of 792. jEthelbert at his departure had charged him vigilantly to oppose all innovation, and to use every means for the furtherance of the catholic faith. In this holy object he found the emperor a most ready co-operator, not only enrolling himself among his pupils, but by his example inducmg the most influential among the nobility and clergy to do the same. Monasteries, those most powerful instruments of education, rose in different parts of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 396 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 703g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236876180
  • 9781236876188