A New Experimental Inquiry Into the Nature and Qualities of the Cheltenham Water; To Which Are Now Added, Observations on Sundry Other Waters with an Appendix on the Mephitic-Alkaline Water

A New Experimental Inquiry Into the Nature and Qualities of the Cheltenham Water; To Which Are Now Added, Observations on Sundry Other Waters with an Appendix on the Mephitic-Alkaline Water

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1788 edition. Excerpt: ... brisker than water fresh fresh drawn at the fountain head. On immersing a small piece of iron in the water, and leaving it in the vessel all night, the water next morning had completely recovered the chalybeate quality, struck a deep purple with galls, and finally, on exposure to the air, threw up a variegated film to the surface, which reflected the prismatic colours. General Inferences from the preceding Experiments. I shall now proceed to illustrate the foregoing experiments, and to deduce from them a few inferences by way of induction. Exp. 1. The sundry precipitants employed in analyzing waters, it must be observed, can only serve to point out the quality not the quantity, of their respective mineral ingredients. From this experiment with tincture of galls, it appears, that the water contains iron, which is farther confirmed by the ochrey sediment which it deposits on the sides of the well. A single drop of the tincture is sufficient to give a distinct purple tinge to 100 cubic inches of distilled water, containing only three grains of martial vitriol, yet three grains of the vitriol contain no more thanT'Tth of a grain of iron. Where the quantity of iron is considerable, instead of a purple, it gives a black tinge. When it exists in in the form of martial vitriol, the colour is more permanent; but when it is suspended by fixed air, it is extremely evanescent, as in the present instance. The reason why this water so soon loses k tinging quality, Will be afterwards more fully edhstdered. '2. From this experiment with vitriolic acid, We learn that the Water contains ah earthy substance suspended by rftfcans of fixed ain The Vitriolic acid, by superior attraction, seizes the earth, and forces the air to quit its hold; hence the copious...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236604415
  • 9781236604415