The New Cabinet Cyclopaedia and Treasury of Knowledge; A Handy Book of Reference on All Subjects and for All Readers. with about Two Thousand Pictoria

The New Cabinet Cyclopaedia and Treasury of Knowledge; A Handy Book of Reference on All Subjects and for All Readers. with about Two Thousand Pictoria

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ... point of view capital is conveniently limited to material CAPITAL CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. objects directly employed in the reproduction of material wealth, but from the higher social point of view many things less immediately concerned in productive work may be regarded as capital Thus Adam Smith includes in the fixed capital of a country, 'the acquired and useful abilities of all the inhabitants;' and the wealth sunk in prisons, educational institutions, ic., plays ultimately a scarcely less important part in production than that invested in directly productive machinery. Capital, an architectural term, usually restricted to the upper portion of a column, the part resting immediately on the shaft. In classic architecture each order has its distinctive capital, but in Egyptian, Indian, Saracenic, Norman, and Gothic they are much diversified. See Column. Capital Punishment, in criminal law, the punishment by death. Formerly in Great Britain, as in many other countries, it was the ordinary form of punishment for felonies of all kinds; but a more accurate knowledge of the nature and remedies of crime, a more discriminating sense of degrees in criminality, and an increased regard for human life have latterly tended to restrict, if not to abolish, the employment of the penalty of death. The improvement in the penal laws of Europe in this respect may be traced in large part to the publication of Beccaria's treatise on Crimes and Punishments (Dei Delitti e delle Pene) in 1764. At that time in England, as Blackstone a year later pointed out with some amount of feeling, there were 160 capital offences in the statute book. The work of practical reform was initiated in 1770 by Sir William Meredith, who moved for a committee of inquiry into the state of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 372 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 662g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236517725
  • 9781236517722