The New Building Estimator; A Practical Guide to Estimating the Cost of Labor and Material in Building Construction, from Excavation to Finish with Various Practical Examples of Work Presented in Detail, and with Labor Figured Chiefly in

The New Building Estimator; A Practical Guide to Estimating the Cost of Labor and Material in Building Construction, from Excavation to Finish with Various Practical Examples of Work Presented in Detail, and with Labor Figured Chiefly in

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...way for an estimator to get the value of a pattern is to take off the lumber--wp at $80 per M in our day--and then judge the amount of labor that is necessary to make it. Where there are many castings this is hardly necessary as the cost is divided. WEIGHTS: --The weight of cast-iron is usually put at 450 lbs to the cf, or a trifle more than.26 per ci. This is lb added to 1-100 lb for those who are so lazy as not to understand decimals. At a distance from tables the rule is easily remembered: Get the ci and mult by.26 lb. A plate 44x68xiJ" weighs 583.44 lbs. By using.26 the loss is only a little more than lbs to 450, and this is close enough for estimating. A column 12' long, 10" in diam outside, with 1" metal, weighs 1,059 lbs without any base or cap. As the metal is 1" thick the inside size is 8"; find the ci in a col of 10" diam and in one of 8"; subtract the difference and mult by.26. An easily remembered rule for all circles is that they are to each other as the sq of their diam. Thus 2 cisterns 8 and 9' diam hold water in the proportion of 64 and 81; a pipe 4' diam has 4 times as much sectional area as one 2'. To get the area of a circle mult the sq of the diam by.7854. The sq of a 10" col is 100, which mult by.7854=78.54; mult by 144"--the length--gives 11,309.76 ci. The sq of the diam of 8 is 64, mult by.7854=50,2656, which mult by 144 gives 7238,246 ci, a difference of 4071.51 ci, which mult by.26=1,059 lbs. The foregoing illustration will serve for odd work: the following table will save the trouble of figuring regular sizes. Cap and base are not included. Outside diam and thickness of metal are given in inches: weight per ft in lbs: WEIGHT OF SQUARE CAST IRON COLS IN LBS PER LF A and b =...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 126 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236577086
  • 9781236577085