A New American Biographical Dictionary, or Remembrancer of the Departed Heroes, Sages, and Statesmen of America; Confined Exclusively to Those Who Signalized Themselves in Either Capacity, in the Revolutionary War 2D Ed. with Important

A New American Biographical Dictionary, or Remembrancer of the Departed Heroes, Sages, and Statesmen of America; Confined Exclusively to Those Who Signalized Themselves in Either Capacity, in the Revolutionary War 2D Ed. with Important

By (author) 

List price: US$20.03

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 edition. Excerpt: ...resist; a pledge that was faithfully redeemed when the hour of trial arrived. It was from this event that the Liberty-Tree took its name. The first convention of South Carolina held their meeting under it." He was also chosen a member of the congress which met in 1774; and on his return early in 1776, received the thanks of the provincial assembly for his services. He was among the first who advocated republican principles, and wished to make his country independent of the monarchial government of Great Britain. During the siege of Charleston, in 1780, he remained within the lines with five of the council, while governor Rut ledge, with the other three, left the city, at the earnest request of general Lincoln. Several months after the capitulation, he was taken out of his bed on the' 27th of August, and, with most of the civil and military officers, transported in a guard-ship to St. Augustine. This was done by the order of lord Cornwallis, and it was in violation of the rights of prisoners on parole. Guards were left at their houses, and the private papers of some of them were examined. A parole was offered at St. Augustine, but such was the indignation of lieutenant governor Gadsden, at the ungenerous treatment which he had received, that he' refused to accept it, and bore a close confinement in the eastle for forty-two weeks, with the greatest fortitude. Garden, in his anecdotes of the revolutionary war, gives the following interesting particulars: "The conduct of the British commanders towards this venerable patriot, in the strongest manner evinced their determination rather to crush the spirit of opposition, than by conciliation to subdue it. The man did not exist to whose delicate sense of honour, even a shadow of duplicity would...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236635973
  • 9781236635976