Neurological Bulletin; Clinical Studies of Nervous and Mental Diseases in the Neurological Department of Columbia University Volume 3

Neurological Bulletin; Clinical Studies of Nervous and Mental Diseases in the Neurological Department of Columbia University Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...movements seen in slight pyramidal lesions and account for the voluntary control of such movements in normal conditions. In view of the fact that pyramidal fibers can only be traced into the pontile tegmentum and not to definite cells, this possibility cannot be entirely excluded on purely anatomical grounds. If, however, this be the case, there should be a difference clinically between lesions of the pyramidal system above the midbrain, where the alleged fibers to the reticular formation begin to be given off, and below this level. As far as the writer is aware there are no such differences, excepting possibly the differences between paraplegia in flexion and in extension to which attention has been called by Walshe. It must be remembered, though, that in many regions injury to the pyramidal fibers is liable to affect tracts in its vicinity which may obscure the picture. In the pes, the pallio-pontile fibers are liable to be involved, in the pons both the pallio-pontile and pontocerebellar systems and in the cord the rubrospinal tract--one of the very tracts it is desirable to exclude. Basal bulbar lesions such as those producing the hypoglossal ty pe of alternating hemiplegia, without deep sensory involvement, would be the best to give a "pure" pyramidal picture. Above the midbrain, capsular lesions obviously may also involve not only pallio-pontile but other systems as well. Nevertheless a more intensive study of selected cases of hemiplegia and paraplegia, especially pursuing a combination clinical method such as that used by Head in his study of sensory paths in the cord, might yield results even without complete autopsy material. Other forebrain neurone systems possibly or probably acting upon the reticular formation are...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 212 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 386g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123653610X
  • 9781236536105