The Negroes in Negroland; The Negroes in America and Negroes Generally. Also, the Several Races of White Men, Considered as the Involuntary and Predes

The Negroes in Negroland; The Negroes in America and Negroes Generally. Also, the Several Races of White Men, Considered as the Involuntary and Predes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ...affecting arguments in favor of the Catholic doctrine."--Murray's African Discoveries, page 54. "lam not to be understood as intimating that any of the numerous tribes are anxious for instruction; they are not the inquiring spirits we read of in other countries; they do not desire the gospel, because they know nothing about either it or its benefits."--Livingstone's Africa, page 544. "The town swarmed with thieves and drunkards, whose only object in life was sensual gratification. Nowhere else had I met with so many impudent and shameless beggars. When a missionary attempted to preach to a crowd in the streets or market, it was very common for some of them to reply by laying their hands on their stomachs, and saying, ' White man, I am hungry.'"--Boweiis Central Africa, page 101. "All missionaries praise the African for his strict observance of the Sabbath. He would have three hundred and sixty-five Sabbaths in the year, if possible, and he would as scrupulously observe them, all."--Burton's Wanderings in West Africa, Vol. I., page 266. ' In the negroes' own country the efforts of the missionaries for hundreds of years have had no effect; the missionary goes away and the people relapse into barbarism. Though a people may be taught the arts and sciences known by more gifted nations, unless they have the power of progression in themselves, they must inevitably relapse in the course of time into their former state."--Du Chaillu's Ashango-Land, page 436. CHAPTER XXVI. MISCELLANEOUS PECULIARITIES, HABITS, MANNERS, AND CUS-TOMS OP THE NEGROES IN NEGROLAND. "their mode of salutation is quite singular. They throw themselves on their backs on the ground, and, rolling from.s. side to side, slap the outside of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123655308X
  • 9781236553089