Naval Hygiene. Human Health and the Means of Preventing Disease; With Illustrative Incidents Principally Derived from Naval Experience

Naval Hygiene. Human Health and the Means of Preventing Disease; With Illustrative Incidents Principally Derived from Naval Experience

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...world, with similar properties. They may any of them be appropriated for food with confidence. Red pepper, Capsicum annuum, posseses simply stimulant properties, void of serious harm. The egg plant, Melmzgena escmlenta, Solanum esculentum, is a popular vegetable, never eaten except when cooked, from which, so far as we know, no harm has ever resulted. The common potato, Solanum tuberosum, in its abundant supply of farinaceous food, comes next in importance to rice and wheat. The plant and even the tubers contain a portion of the poisonous solania; but not enough to do harm in any quantity which could possibly be eaten. By cooking this is effectually destroyed. Practically, raw potatoes have been found the most effectual remedy for scorbutus. Bittersweet, woody nightshade, Solanum dulcamara, is doubtless poisonous, though not very actively so. Professor Dunglison, says: " He has seen it chewed by boys in large quantities, and has chewed it himself when a boy, without observing any effect from it, except what was caused by its saccharine and gummy matter. The decoction, extract, and fruit have all been given in large quantities, with no efl-ect." We remember to have read the account of a very different ease which occurred to Dr. Isaac Parrish: " The little patient died with symptoms of narcotic poisoning, which it was impossible to account for till an examination discovered the stomach full of the berries of this plant." (203.) Black nightshade, Solanu/m nigrum, has a bad reputation, which it probably deserves. It is an ugly weed, with a repulsive smell, which probably prevents accidents, for otherwise its black berries might thoughtlessly be eaten. The Solanum pseudocapsicum, Jerusalem cherry, has similar and more...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236782429
  • 9781236782427