The Nature and Properties of the Sugar Cane; With Practical Directions for the Improvement of Its Cultures, and the Manufacture of Its Products

The Nature and Properties of the Sugar Cane; With Practical Directions for the Improvement of Its Cultures, and the Manufacture of Its Products

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1831 edition. Excerpt: ...in proportion as the latter has a greater portion of uncrystallizable matter compared to its essential salt, more fuel will, of course, be expended, as there will be a greater quantity to be reheated. It can, therefore, only be found and ascertained by experiment whether this be a fatal objection to a process, which appears to have, otherwise, so many great advantages to recommend its adoption.' Major Moody, who had the charge of the crown plantations in Gaudaloupe, informs us that this increased expenditure of fuel was one principal objection to the adoption of Dutrone's system in that Island, where the expressed cane is chiefly Used in boiling the juice. CHAPTER XII. ANALYSIS AND PROPERTIES. OF SUGAR. According to Theophrastus, the ancients considered sugar to be a sort of honey. It has, however, as we have already shown, been long known under the form of large, hard, and transparent crystals, which we de. nominate sugar-candy. In this state its crystals, which are very readily concreted, contain scarcely any water of crystallization. The experiments of Berzelius show that they are composed of Real sugar... 100 Water.... 5.6. 105.6 parts. The primitive form of these crystals is a four-sided prism, whose base is a paralleldgram, the length being to the bre&dth as 10 to 7, and the height of the prism being a mean propprtional between the sides of the parallelogram. The form, however, is found to Vary very much, and Monsieur Rome de I'Isle reckons seven varieties of crystals; they are frequently four or six-sided prisms, terminated by two-sided and sometimes by threesided summits. Sugar is very soluble in water, much less so in alcohol. Wenzel tells us that four parts of boiling alcohol dissolve, one part of sugar, but this proportion is much...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575865
  • 9781236575869