A Naturalist in Western China; With Vasculum, Camera, and Gun; Being Some Account of Eleven Years' Travel, Exploration, and Observation in the More Remote Parts of the Flowery Kingdom Volume 2

A Naturalist in Western China; With Vasculum, Camera, and Gun; Being Some Account of Eleven Years' Travel, Exploration, and Observation in the More Remote Parts of the Flowery Kingdom Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...are used in Chinese theatricals in the same way as the tail-feathers of the Reeves Pheasant. The cape is also used in west Szechuan to adorn the caps of favourite male children. In the adult male the crown, upper back, and breast are resplendent dark green; rump, ochre-yellow with scarlet feathers in the upper coverts and on the lower rump; from the back of the crown projects a crest composed of a few long crimson feathers; the cape is white, margined with black, with outer feathers deep brown, barred with black; tail white, speckled and barred with black; length about 44 inches, tip to tip. The female is considerably smaller than the male and shows no sign of the cape; the crown and hind neck plumage is washed with greyish; back, buff-brown, barred; chest, buff, with under-parts lighter. The Amherst has long been known in Occidental aviaries, and some interesting crosses between it and the Golden have been made. To my mind this bird is the most beautiful of all the Pheasants found in Western China. A colloquial name around Wa shan for it is " Kwong-kwong che." The shooting of this Pheasant, save by chance, is very difficult, but there are places where, by adopting the methods advocated for securing the Golden Pheasant, a few birds at any rate would reward an ardent sportsman. As a table-bird the Amherst is scarcely worthy of consideration; the flesh is coarse and without flavour. BLOOD PHEASANTS A common bird in the upland thickets between 8000 to 12,000 feet elevation throughout western Szechuan is Ithagenes geoffroyi. Around Tachienlu it is abundant, especially in thickets of Evergreen Oak and Juniper. This bird lies very close and is usually found in small coveys. When pressed by the dog it flies up into the taller bushes, making at...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236668693
  • 9781236668691