Natural Religion Insufficient, and Revealed Necessary, to Man's Happiness in His Present State, Or, a Rational Inquiry Into the Principles of the Modern Deists; Wherin Is Largely Discovered Their Utter Insufficiency to Answer the Great

Natural Religion Insufficient, and Revealed Necessary, to Man's Happiness in His Present State, Or, a Rational Inquiry Into the Principles of the Modern Deists; Wherin Is Largely Discovered Their Utter Insufficiency to Answer the Great

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ...and others' satisfaction. Nor is there any ground to quarrel, if he deal even with the worst, as equal judges do with the mother, guilty of some manifest crime; they not only spare and delay the execution, till the child whom they design mercy to, is brought forth; but do not take notice of her, or intimate even a purpose of punishment, till afterwards, lest the child should suffer by the mother's despair and grief. 4. This is yet more remarkably just in God, who can on the one hand secure the criminal, so that justice shall not suffer by the delay, and on the. other, that the criminal shall not run out into those impieties, that would cross the ends, endanger the safety, or wrong the reputation of his government, with those who are capable of making an equal estimate of things. 7. It was every way suitable and necessary that the persons thus spared, should be continued under a moral government. They were not to be ruled by mere force: 1. Because they are, while under such a forbearance, capable of some sort of a moral government. When a prince deals with persons, whom he knows to be on treasonable plots against this government, and conceals his resentment, he still manages them as subjects, and continues them under a government; nor is he faulty in doing so. 2. They arc not,"while under such a forbearance, capable of any other government; for if once the Ruler of the world begin to deal in a way of force and justice with them, then this forbearance is at an end. 3. It were a manifest reproach to the Governor of the world, if they were supposed under no government at all. Besides, on this supposition, the ends of his forbearance could not be reached. And moreover, the moral dependence of creatures on their Creator, which can only be maintained...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 168 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236659619
  • 9781236659613