The Natural History of North-Carolina; With an Account of the Trade, Manners, and Customs of the Christian and Indian Inhabitants. Illustrated with Copper-Plates, Whereon Are Curiously Engraved the Map of the Country, Several Strange

The Natural History of North-Carolina; With an Account of the Trade, Manners, and Customs of the Christian and Indian Inhabitants. Illustrated with Copper-Plates, Whereon Are Curiously Engraved the Map of the Country, Several Strange

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1737 edition. Excerpt: ...good Broath. Their Quills make good Pens, and the Feathers serve for other uses. The Indians eat their Eggs, which have a strong smell, are hard of Digestion, and of an unpleasant taste. The Gall is good against Palsies, Consumptions, Blindness and Deafness. The Fat or Grease helps all hardness, being of the Nature of Goose-grease. They flie with the Wind, make a great Noise, run fast, and are said to live about forty Years. The Storkes are a larger Fowl than the former, and of the same Shape, only their Necks are thicker and shorter, and Cc are are of a dark grey Colour. They are frequently to be met with amongst the Cranes, they make a clattering Noise with their Bills, by the quick and frequent striking one Chap against the other. It is reported by several Persons whom I have conversed with, that they are to be found in no part of America but in this Province. They feed on Frogs, Snails, and many other sorts of Insects. The Flesh nourishes as that of the Herons and Bitterns, and the other Parts of this Fowl have the same Virtues with them. The Swans, whereof there are two sorts. The first are called the Trumpeters, from a trumpeting sort of noise they make, and are the largest sort of Swans in these parts. They come here in the Winter, and remain with us 'till February, in such great Floeks, that I never saw more of any Waterfowl in all my Travels than of them, for at that Season, they are in such vast Numbers on each side of the fresh Water Rivers and Creeks, that at a distance it seems to be Land covered with Snow. About Christmas they are frequently so fat, that some of them are scarce able to fly. In Spring they go to the Northern Lakes to breed. I have several times eat of them, and do prefer them before any Goose, for the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236927192
  • 9781236927194