The Natural History of the Bible; Or, a Description of All the Quadrupeds, Birds, Fiches, Reptiles, and Insects, Trees, Plants, Flowers, Gums, and Precious Stones, Mentioned in the Sacred Scriptures

The Natural History of the Bible; Or, a Description of All the Quadrupeds, Birds, Fiches, Reptiles, and Insects, Trees, Plants, Flowers, Gums, and Precious Stones, Mentioned in the Sacred Scriptures

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ... The following verse may be thus translated: 'Insomuch that the reserve he had made, and the deposit he had placed with great care in supposed security, shall be driven off to the brook of the willows Hebr. river of the Orebim. Consult the anxiety of Ahab, who sent all over his kingdom to discover at the brooks grass enough to save the horses alive. Quere, whether on this occasion he would have sent them to feed at the brooks; or would have had the grass cut and brought to them? Ahab, it seems, hoped for the possibility of finding grass, i. e. not grass left from a former growth, but chajir, fresh tender shoots of grass just budding, 1 Kings, xviii. 5. "A similar gradation of poetical imagery is used 2 Kings, xix. 26, 'Their inhabitants were of shortened hand; dismayed, ashamed, they were as grass of the field vegetables in general, as the green buddings desha; as the tender risings chqjir on the house tops; and those too struck by the wind before they advanced in growth to a rising up.' What a climax expressive of imbecility! "Is it not unhappy that in the only two places of the Old Testament where our translators have used the word hay, it should be necessary to substitute a word of a directly contrary meaning, in order to accommodate the true rendering of the passages to the native (eastern) ideas of their authors f" HAZEL, rh Lutz. Occurs only Genesis, xxx. 37. St. Jerom, Hiller, Celsius, and Dr. Shaw say that the almondtree is spoken of here; and that by lauz or luz, the Arabians always mean the almond: he must mean the amygdalus sylvestris, which Rauwolf calls "Lauzi Arabum. Crescit circa Tripolin et Halepum in sepibus. Fructus inserviunt mensis secundis." See Almond. HEATH. )jrv Oror. Jerem. xvii. 6, and xlviii. 6....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236585623
  • 9781236585622