The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne. Standard Ed. by E.T. Bennett, Revised with Additional Notes by J.E. Harting

The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne. Standard Ed. by E.T. Bennett, Revised with Additional Notes by J.E. Harting

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...it is not necessary to assume the existence of a gulf into which the mass was absorbed. The geological relations of the strata, he says, point to a much easier, as well as a more correct, explanation of the occurrence. Here, as elsewhere throughout the district, the malm rock or freestone of the upper greensand formation rests upon the gault or blue clay: a rock upon a yielding base. An adequate weight, placed upon so unfirm a soil as the lower of these formations, must of necessity sink into it. So prodigious a mass as that which, on the occasion described in the text, was separated from its adhesion to its native rock, and left to be supported by the soft clay alone, was more than its pulpy nature could support, and it gave way accordingly; receiving into its yielding substance, and burying almost entirely beneath its surface the detached face of the cliff, which subsided into it so easily and so perpendicularly as not to disturb the adjustment of a gate upon the sunken mass, once on the top, and now at the foot of the escarpment. In other situations, and particularly on the southern coast of the Isle of Wight, slips similar to that of Hawkley have taken place, and from the same cause: either the separation of a portion of the freestone rock of the upper greensand formation and its subsidence into the gault; or the loosening of the gault, and the subsequent separation and subsidence of a portion of the freestone, which could no longer be supported when its natural foundation had thus given way.--Ed. found that a deep rift or chasm had opened under thenhouses, and torn them, as it were, in two; and that one end of the barn had suffered in a similar manner; that a pond near the cottage had undergone a strange reverse, becoming deep at the shallow...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 178 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236613287
  • 9781236613288