A Natural History of the Animal Kingdom; Being a Systematic and Popular Description of the Habits, Structure, and Classification of Animals, from the Lowest to the Highest Forms, Arranged According to Their Organization

A Natural History of the Animal Kingdom; Being a Systematic and Popular Description of the Habits, Structure, and Classification of Animals, from the Lowest to the Highest Forms, Arranged According to Their Organization

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...tho Great Auk. This bird is very abundant in the Arctic sca3, and occurs on our coasts in considerable numbers in the autumn, passing gradually more and moro towards the south as the winter advances. Mr. Yarrell mentions that it has been found on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. The commonest of our British Alcidje, tho Puffin (Fratercula arctica, Fig. 123), is a summer visitant, arriving on our shores iu the months of April and May, and quitting them for more southern regions about the middle of August. It is about a foot in THE PUFFIN--THE GUILLEMOTS. 431 length, and has a singularly compressed bill, with throe grooves on each side of each mandible; with this it often excavates deep burrows in the sandy ground near the coast, in which it lays and hatches a single white egg. When rabbit-warrens, as is often the case, approach sufficiently close to the sea-shore to suit the convenience of the Puffins, they have no hesitation in taking possession of them, and their strong bills enable them to drive out the original inhabitants with great ease. When captured, they bite and scratch very severely. It is found on all parts of the British coasts; and in some of the Scottish islands forms, with other water-fowl, a considerable portion of the food of the inhabitants; it is eaten fresh, or salted and dried for winter use. The Puffin also occurs in all the northern coasts of Europe, and on the eastern coast of North America. It flies, swims, and dives well. The Guillemots (Una) differ from the Auks and Puffins in their straight, pointed bills, but resemble them in the form of their bodies and in their general habits. They lay their eggs upon the bare surface of the ledges of rocks, and here the young ones remain for some time. It appears, however, that the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 446 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 23mm | 789g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123649699X
  • 9781236496997