The Natives of Sarawak and British North Borneo; Based Chiefly on the Mss. of the Late H. B. Low, Sarawak Government Service Volume 2

The Natives of Sarawak and British North Borneo; Based Chiefly on the Mss. of the Late H. B. Low, Sarawak Government Service Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...College Gardens, Dublin, says that from a hint given him by Sir Hugh Low, he finds "the tapang tree is Koompassia excelsa Taubert, syn Abauria excelsa Beccari." Oils. "Mengkabang, or vegetable tallow Dipterocarpus, is procured in the following manner from one of the wild fruits of the jungle: --When the fruit, a species of nut, has been gathered, it is picked, dried, and pounded, and after being thoroughly heated in a shallow cauldron, it is put into a rattan bag and subjected to a powerful pressure. The oil oozes from the bag, and being run into bamboo moulds is there allowed to cool, in which state it becomes hard and yellow, somewhat resembling unpurified bees' wax. It is principally used by the Dyaks and Malays for cooking, being very palatable, but in this country it is employed for the manufacture of patent candles, for which it is superior to palm oil. "Katio oil is procured from another wild nut, and is expressed in a somewhat similar manner. It is a beautiful yellow transparent fluid, with a smell very much like bitter almonds, and I have little doubt that it will yet be found a very valuable article of commerce. "The press employed by the Dyaks in expressing these oils is, like many other of their contrivances, both simple and effective. It consists of two semi-cylindrical logs about 7 feet long, placed in an upright position, their flat surfaces being fitted together and their lower ends securely fastened to each other. On each of their upper ends a stout knob is cut, and a third piece of wood, about two feet long, nine inches wide, and two inches thick, with a hole cut in about a foot long and three inches wide, is put over the knobs so as to clasp them together. Wedges are then inserted between the outside of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 10.41mm | 358.34g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236626737
  • 9781236626738