Narratives of Voyages and Excursions on the East Coast and in the Interior of Central America; Describing a Journey Up the River San Juan, and Passage Across the Lake of Nicaragua to the City of Leon Pointing Out the Advantages of a

Narratives of Voyages and Excursions on the East Coast and in the Interior of Central America; Describing a Journey Up the River San Juan, and Passage Across the Lake of Nicaragua to the City of Leon Pointing Out the Advantages of a

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...as the chief of this settlement. Here we remained two days, and were hospitably' entertained, the King and his people being, from the following circumstance, kept in a constant state of excitement. A pipe of white Wine had been discovered on the beach, and rolled to Morton's residence; he and his neighbours epened the cask, and continued drinking for several days, unremittingly, until it was finished. The-men were, however, surprised to find that the women continued to be tipsy; they had also found a cask and concealed it in the bushes, for their own private use. This was soon discovered, ' and Morton, in rebuking them, said, that ' for woman to get drunk was not English lady fashion.' This cask was also brought to the settlement, and the men recommenced drinking until all were completely satiated. The remainder, about half a pipe, was presented to us; and our party, after drinking as much as they could, carried oil'-part of it as all sea stock. Continuing our voyage, We kept inside the La n 5 158 RIO nnnea. goon until we arrived at Tabacountia, a small stream running from a branch of the Lagoon into the ocean, about five miles from Patook. This stream has only three or four feet water at its entrance; and, in the best weather, it can only be entered by small canoes. VVe arrived at figatogk the same evening; a strong currents was slitting out of it; the bar, on which there is generally eight or ten feet of water, shifts in the rainy season, or during heavy gales, and occasionally leaves a suflicient depth for vessels of considerable burden. The tides, which seldom or never rise exceeding a few 'feet, ebb and flow into it for some miles; it is of considerable magnitude, being augmented by several tributary...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236525531
  • 9781236525536