Narrative of the Surveying Voyage of H.M.S. Fly; Commanded by Captain F.P. Blackwood, R.N., in Torres Strait, New Guinea, and Other Islands of the Eastern Archipelago, During the Years 1842-1846

Narrative of the Surveying Voyage of H.M.S. Fly; Commanded by Captain F.P. Blackwood, R.N., in Torres Strait, New Guinea, and Other Islands of the Eastern Archipelago, During the Years 1842-1846 : Together with an Excursion Into Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...and 208 VOLCANIC ORIGIN. sorting the materials have undergone, and from their being strewed in narrow lines and sheets over large spaces, with the same thickness in all its parts. It is evident that if the pebbles of lava of which some of the beds are composed, had been deposited on a slope of any thing like the angle they now have, either in air or under water, they must, many of them, have rolled down and accumulated at its foot, and the bed formed of them have been much thicker there than elsewhere. Since the deposition of these beds, therefore, they have been elevated above the sea from 300 to 700 feet, and in some places tilted up into an angle of 60; and in the island of Erroob they have been covered up by a thickness of 400 or 500 feet of igneous rock, sometime after their deposition, and either previously or subsequently to their elevation above the sea. I did not succeed in finding any organic remains to give a relative date to the formation of these rocks, but the pieces of limestone look exactly like the masses of limestone now forming in the coral reefs, just so much altered by heat, as we might expect from the circumstances they would be. I believe that, geologically speaking, these volcanic islands are of recent origin. They are evidently an offset of that great belt of volcanic operations, part of which ranges at no great distance to the northward and eastward, along the north coast of New Guinea, into the Solomon Islands, New Hebrides, and New Zealand. On April 19th we again anchored at Erroob, on METHOD OF HOLDING THE BOW. 5209 our way to the coast of New Guinea. As it rained heavily, I went into one of the larger huts, which had a fire in the middle. There were good bed places, covered with mats, raised about a foot and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236804333
  • 9781236804334