Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage, and of a Residence in the Artic Regions During the Years 1829-1830-1831-1832-1833

Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage, and of a Residence in the Artic Regions During the Years 1829-1830-1831-1832-1833

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ... sledges could not go, we must leave all our baggage at the hut, and that we might then proceed to Aw-wuk-too-leak and return to sleep. We accordingly set out at half-past seven, taking with us our arms and thrce of the dogs, in case of our falling in with any more of the musk oxen, and leaving Mr. Abernethy and the boy in charge of the baggage. Travelling over a very rugged country covered with deep snow, during two hours, we at length descended on the lake which they call Aw-wuk-too-teak and which will be found in the chart. This piece of water extends, according to its longest dimensions, from north-east by east to south-west by west, and, in this direction, appeared about four miles in length. In shape, it is very irregular, as it is bounded by five distinct hills, separated from each other by an equal number of ravines, which, during the thaw, are watercourses, supplying the lake. Where it empties itself, the issuing stream is broad, and appeared to be shallow; but its source seemed to be a rapid one, and its termination was in the sea to the northward. The names of these hills as given by the guide are as follow. distinguishing them by their true bearings, from the centre of the lake: namely, that to the west is called Pood-le-ra-nuk, to the north-west ll-low-nuk, to the north-east Ac-cood-le-ruk-tuk, to the west-south-west Tak-ke-noo-ra-lig, and to the south ll-low-nalig. Poo-yet-tah farther informed me that the lake contained three different kinds of fish, which remain in it throughout the winter, that it was of great depth, and that in the smaller lake to the eastward, called Ow-weet-te-week, where the "party that first saw our ship in the September of 1829, had been encamped, there was also abundance of fish of a large size....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 210 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 386g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236546059
  • 9781236546050