Narrative of a Journey Through the Upper Provinces of India, from Calcutta to Bombay, 1824-1825 (with Notes Upon Ceylon); An Account of a Journey to Madras and the Southern Provinces, 1826 and Letters Written in India Volume 2

Narrative of a Journey Through the Upper Provinces of India, from Calcutta to Bombay, 1824-1825 (with Notes Upon Ceylon); An Account of a Journey to Madras and the Southern Provinces, 1826 and Letters Written in India Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1873 edition. Excerpt: ...or native town, is extensive, and the houses neat. At present it has a very gay appearance, from being ornamented m the Cingalese manner, in honour of the Bishop's arrival, with palm-branches, flowers, and fruits, in which kind of decoration the natives are very ingenious, and which gives the whole village the appearance of a jubilee. Mr. Sansoni's is a lowerroomed house, but very spacious and comfortable, commanding a view of the harbour. He is an Italian by birth, but is become quite Anglicised by a long residence in the island. The Cingalese on the coast differ very much from any Indians I have yet seen, and their language, also, is different; they wear no turban, or other kind of covering, on the head, but turn up their long black hair with large tortoiseshell combs; the coolies and labouring-classes have merely the waistcloth, as in Bengal; but the "moodeliers," or native magistrates, head-men, as they are generally called, wear a strange mixture of the Portuguese and native dress, but handsome, from the gold with which it is covered. The moodelier of Galle, and all his family, are Christians; he is a most respectable man, in face and figure resembling Louis XVIII., to whom his sons also bear a strong likeness: the old man wears a handsome gold medal, given him for meritorious conduct. August 26.--The heat is said to be never very oppressive at Guile, being constantly tempered by sea-breezes, and by frequent rain; the total absence of punkahs, indeed, proves the climate to be moderate. The fort was built by the Dutch, and is a good deal out of repair. We dined to-day at Mr. Layard's, who has an excellent house within its walls; we went in our palanquins, and instead of the lanterns to which we had been accustomed in Calcutta and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123652537X
  • 9781236525376