The Narrative of the Honourable John Byron Containing an Account of the Great Distresses Suffered by Himself and His Companions on the Coast of Pata

The Narrative of the Honourable John Byron Containing an Account of the Great Distresses Suffered by Himself and His Companions on the Coast of Pata

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1768 edition. Excerpt: ...attention which our neceffitous condition drew from captain Cheap, may be im-l puted likewise, in some measure, to thCeffects of a mind soured by a series of. Crosses and disappointments z which, indeed, had operated on us all to a great neglect of each other, and sometimes of ourselves. We We were not suffered to be in the same wigwam with the cacique and his wife; which, if we had had any countenance from captain Cheap, would not have been refused. What we had made for ourselves was in such a bungling manner, that it scarce deserved the name even of this wretched sort of habitation. But our untoward circum rival of the Indians we waited for; who brought with them some seal, a small portion of which fell to our share. A night or two after they sent out some of their young men, who procured us a quantity of 'a very delicate kind of birds, called-shags and cormorants. Their manner of taking these birds resembles something a sport called bat--fowling. They find out their haunts among the rocks and cliffs in the night, when taking with them torches made, of the bark ( 14 I ) bark of the birch tree, which is common here, and grows to a very large size (this bark has a very unctuous quality, and emits a bright and clear light; and in the northern parts of America is used frequently instead of a candle) they bring the boat's fide as near as possible to the rocks, under the roofling-places of these birds; then waving their lights backwards and forwards, the birds are dazzled and confounded so as to fall into the canoe, where they are instantly knocked on the head with a short stick the Indians take with them for that pur pose. a Seal are taken in some less frequented parts of these coasis, with great ease; but when their haunts have been two or...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236929810
  • 9781236929815