Narrative of Discovery and Adventure in Africa, from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time; With Illustr. of the Geology, Mineralogy and Zoology with a Map Plans of the Routes of Park, and of Denham and Clapperton and 13 Engravings by

Narrative of Discovery and Adventure in Africa, from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time; With Illustr. of the Geology, Mineralogy and Zoology with a Map Plans of the Routes of Park, and of Denham and Clapperton and 13 Engravings by

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...custom would excite an insurrection among the inhabitants. The Fellatas have penetrated in great numbers into Yarriba, and are gradually becoming masters of that country in defiance of the feeble resistance of the native sovereign. They had established themselves at Alorie, about three days' journey to the south-west of Eyeo, which, by the influx of fresh bodies of them, and of numbers of Yarriban THE FELLATAS RECEPTION AT EYEO. 287 slaves and other malecontents, has become a larger city than the capital. Lander afterwards, in Nyffe, heard them boast that "they could conquer the whole world if the salt water did not prevent them." They are a race decidedly superior to those whom they are supplanting; active, intelligent, and, unless in the heat of warfare, even mild and humane. Our traveller in particular was as much pleased with the deportment of the Fellata females as he had been disgusted and harassed by that of the royal ladies of Yarriba. Their dress is arranged with taste; their hair is braided with peculiar neatness; and their manners, artless and simple, almost realize the idea of the poetical shepherdess. Their conversation, at once modest, respectful, and kindly, proved a recreation in the midst of troubles, and leave-taking was sometimes attended with considerable regret. The travellers were, as before, well received at Eyeo, though the negotiation with Ebo, the fat eunuch, was not conducted without difficulty. Lander had been judiciously directed to proceed by the shortest route to the Niger, which is distant only about forty miles from Eyeo, and by no means to delay his progress by going to Youri (which he now calls Yaoorie), though his brother John might if expedient be sent thither. The eunuch, however, expressed his...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123657799X
  • 9781236577993