The Myth of Media Globalization

The Myth of Media Globalization

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Description

The ongoing interconnection of the world through modern mass media is generally considered to be one of the major developments underpinning globalization. This important book considers anew the globalization phenomenon in the media sphere. Rather than heralding globalization or warning of its dangers, as in many other books, Kai Hafez analyses the degree to which media globalization is really taking place. Do we have enough evidence to show that there is a linear and accelerated move towards transnationalization in the media? All too often the empirical data presented seems rather more anecdotal than representative. Many transborder media phenomena are overestimated and taken out of the context of locally and nationally oriented mainstream media processes all over the world. The inherent danger is that a central paradigm of the social sciences, rather than bearing scholarly substance, will turn out to be a myth and even a sometimes dangerously ideological tool. Based on a theoretical debate of media globalization, the work discusses most major fields of media development, including foreign reporting, satellite TV, film, internet, foreign broadcasting, media and migration, media policy and media economy. As an important new contribution to timely debates, The Myth of Media Globalization will be essential and provocative reading for students and scholars alike.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 236 pages
  • 152 x 226 x 20mm | 439.99g
  • Polity Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1, black & white illustrations
  • 0745639089
  • 9780745639086
  • 2,168,483

Review quote

"Given the scope and clarity, I would not hesitate to assign the book in upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses. Hafez delivers and airtight argument to respond to declarations about the new role of the 'global media' in a post-everything era." British Journal of Sociology "A well-argued, much-needed intervention that pleads for better scholarship to illuminate the 'necessary myth' of globalization ... translated into very readable English by Alex Skinner." Global Media and Communication "The book offers a good combination of theoretical and empirical response to the mainstream debate about globalization challenges the easy assumption that the advance of globalization is inevitably taking over the world with enormous influence on different societies in terms of national politics, cultures and economy. What Hafez manages to achieve in this book is to affirm that there are no truly transnational media, and that the ultimate power in media regulation remains in national hands. We are yet to see the emergence of a global public sphere. Along with this interesting and useful argument that is not so 'conventional', this book offers a thorough review of the mainstream debate over globalization and its influence over the world, which I feel will be very useful. A major virtue of this book is that it does not only look into the cultural dimension of globalization, but also into the economic implications and impacts upon national politics, media policies and news and information." European Journal of Communication "Hafez definitely succeeds at what he sets out to do: to critically summarize and assess the available empirical evidence of the various dimensions of media globalization using a system theory framework. The emphasis on actual empirical evidence for key statements in globalization scholarship is refreshing, and this book is an important contribution to the ongoing debate about media globalization. Recommended." Hot Topics in Journalism and Mass Communication "Hafez raises many important questions in a sober and critical way, without ever preaching. He shows a critical detachment that is further enhanced by the fact that he, unlike many of his colleagues, always keeps a focus on the way the individual interacts with the media. No matter what topic he discusses A- the digital divide, xenophobia, or the new world order in the information age A- Hafez never losses sight of the individuals who are hit by the wave of globalization and always insists on their (partial) immunity to the insinuations of global communication." Political Communication "This book will provoke controversy amongst media scholars and it will certainly become a 'must read' for any student working in the field." Colin Sparks, University of Westminster "Hafez's book is well written. The point is made convincingly that so far no global public sphere has been established. Therefore it seems too early to talk about a paradigmatic change of the global communication system. Nevertheless, Hafez argues, the myth of globalization has been helpful for a better understanding of global processes." Hans Kleinsteuber, University of Hamburgshow more

About Kai Hafez

Kai Hafez is Chair for International and Comparative Communication Studies at the University of Erfurt.show more

Back cover copy

The ongoing interconnection of the world through modern mass media is generally considered to be one of the major developments underpinning globalization. This important book considers anew the globalization phenomenon in the media sphere. Rather than heralding globalization or warning of its dangers, as in many other books, Kai Hafez analyses the degree to which media globalization is really taking place. Do we have enough evidence to show that there is a linear and accelerated move towards transnationalization in the media? All too often the empirical data presented seems rather more anecdotal than representative. Many transborder media phenomena are overestimated and taken out of the context of locally and nationally oriented mainstream media processes all over the world. The inherent danger is that a central paradigm of the social sciences, rather than bearing scholarly substance, will turn out to be a myth and even a sometimes dangerously ideological tool. Based on a theoretical debate of media globalization, the work discusses most major fields of media development, including foreign reporting, satellite TV, film, internet, foreign broadcasting, media and migration, media policy and media economy. As an important new contribution to timely debates, The Myth of Media Globalization will be essential and provocative reading for students and scholars alike.show more

Table of contents

* Introduction *1. Theory - structural transformation of the global public sphere? *1.1 System connectivity *1.2 System change *1.3 System interdependence *2. International reporting - 'No further than Columbus...' *2.1 The world-view of international reporting *2.2 The global non-dialogue of 11 September 2001 *2.3 The Iraq War 2003: war reporting in the far from obsolete nation state *2.4 The myth within the myth: the 'CNN effect' *3. Satellite television - the renaissance of world regions *3.1 Cross-border media use and the triumph of the monolingual middle classes over cosmopolitan elites *3.2 Global television and the 'spiral of silence' afflicting democratisation *3.3 The regionalisation of the media in geo-linguistic areas: 'Huntington' on the small screen *3.4 The case of al-Jazeera: an 'Arab CNN'? *4. Film and programme imports - entertainment culture as the core of media globalisation *4.1 Who's afraid of Uncle Sam? Relativising American cultural hegemony *4.2 How the globalisation of entertainment culture helps permeable national cultures modernise *5. The Internet - the Information Revolution which came too late for the 'Third Wave of democratisation' *5.1 The Net as Tower of Babel *5.2 The digital divide *5.3 Virtual cosmopolitanism *5.4 The 'Zapatista effect' *6. International broadcasting - from national propaganda to global dialogue and back again *6.1 After 11 September: the new war in the ether *6.2 Interdependence gaps and attempts at reform *7. Media and immigration - ethnicity and transculturalism in the media age *7.1 Cultural exiles and bi-culturals: immigrant media use *7.2 A persistent cultural deficit: xenophobia in the age of global media *8. Media policy - why the state continues to play a role *8.1 The 'New World Information Order' in the age of globalisation: the rudiments of a pancapitalist visionshow more

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