Musical Meaning in Beethoven

Musical Meaning in Beethoven : Markedness, Correlation, and Interpretation

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"Hatten's interpretations are at times surprisingly poetic in their expression.... In his book he effectively creates an interaction between aspects of music theory, analysis, aesthetics and semiotics. His work yields some novel insights that deserve careful consideration from anyone in these fields." -The Semiotic Review of BooksMusical Meaning in Beethoven offers a fresh approach to the problem of expressive meaning in music. Beginning with a provocative analysis of the slow movement of the Hammerklavier piano sonata, Robert S. Hatten examines the roles of markedness, Classical topics, expressive genres, and musical tropes in fostering expressive interpretation at all levels of structure. Close readings of movements from Beethoven's late piano sonatas and string quartets highlight less obvious expressive meanings and explain how more familiar stylistic meanings are consistently cued from one work to the next. Co-recipient of the 1997 Wallace Berry Publication Award from the Society for Music Theory.Musical Meaning and Interpretation-Robert S. Hatten, editorshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 368 pages
  • 154 x 234 x 24mm | 521.63g
  • Indiana University Press
  • Bloomington, IN, United States
  • English
  • 0253217113
  • 9780253217110
  • 744,681

Review quote

"Hatten's interpretations are at times surprisingly poetic in their expression... In his book he effectively creates an interaction between aspects of music theory, analysis, aesthetics and semiotics. His work yields some novel insights that deserve careful consideration from anyone in these fields." oThe Semiotic Review of Booksshow more

Table of contents

Foreword by David LidovPrefaceIntroductionPart I. Interpretation and TheoryI. A Case Study for InterpretationThe Third Movement of Op. 106 (Hammerklavier)II. Correlation, Interpretation, and the Markedness of OppositionsIII. From Topic to Expressive GenreIV. The Pastoral Expressive GenreThe Four Movements of Op. 101V. The Thematic Level and the Markedness of Classical MaterialVI. Thematic MarkednessThe First Movements of Op. 130 and Op. 131VII. Beyond the Hierarchies of CorrelationTroping, Irony, Levels of Discourse, and IntertextualityVIII. Analysis and SynthesisThe Cavatina from Op. 130IX. From the Aesthetic to me SemioticX. Further Perspectives on Musical Meaning and CognitionConclusionAppendix: Abnegation and the New GenreGlossaryNotesBibliographyIndex of ConceptsIndex of Names and Worksshow more

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