Music of Nature; Or, an Attempt to Prove That What Is Passionate & Pleasing in the Art of Singing, Speaking, & Performing Upon Musical Instruments, Is

Music of Nature; Or, an Attempt to Prove That What Is Passionate & Pleasing in the Art of Singing, Speaking, & Performing Upon Musical Instruments, Is

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ... the dance. The Italian and French trace the origin of this instrument to England: -We refer it to the Irish and Welsh. If, as some suppose, Ireland was colonized by the Phtenicians, we may reasonably conclude that the harp was originally brought from the east by that people Of the few ' The most ancient harp is shewn in the museum of Trinity College, Dublin. According to generally-received tradition, it was carried to Rome by Donagh, on his father being dethroned, in 1064; and the exile is said to have laid the harp, with the crown and other regalia of the Irish monarch, at the feet of the Pope, as a full submission of the kingdom of Ireland. It is even asserted, that Adrian avowed this circumstance as one of the principal grounds for the title, which, by his alleged Bull, he transferred to Henry II. These symbols of homage remained in the Vatican till the reign of Henry VIII., when the Pope, reserving to himself the crown, which was of massive gold, sent the harp to that English sovereign. The tyrant, however, placing but little value on the instrument, gave it to the first Earl of Clanrieard, in whose family it continued till the beginning of the last century, when it passed in the female line into other custody, and has been ultimately deposited in the museum before mentioned. instruments known to the ancients, the lyre or harp was the best adapted to accompanying their declamations. Its sharp and decided tone supported the voice without incommoding it; and notwithstanding the extravagant descriptions of the Greek authors, their music probably did not exceed in effect that of recitative of the rudest kind. The simplicity and uncouth structure of their instruments at once prove the truth of this assertion. But their taste in language, no..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581571
  • 9781236581570