Museum of French Monuments; Or, an Historical and Chronological Description of the Monuments, in Marble, Bronze, and Bas-Relief, Collected in the Museum of Paris, Ornamented with Elegant Etchings Volume 1

Museum of French Monuments; Or, an Historical and Chronological Description of the Monuments, in Marble, Bronze, and Bas-Relief, Collected in the Museum of Paris, Ornamented with Elegant Etchings Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1803 edition. Excerpt: ...priests were very curious, in order to sell them at a high price to the credulous. The sculpture of this monument is so coarse, that Esus has rather the appearance of a woodman lopping a tree, than of a god. Felibien, in his History of Paris, thus expresses himself concerning it, Vol. I. page 155: " On the front of the second stone, is a man without a beard, his clothes are short as those of Vulcan's, and like him the right shoulder and arm are naked, the left knee rests against the trunk of a tree, the right foot is on the ground, the left hand grasps a leafy branch, the right uplifted, and armed with something that we have discovered to be a kind of adze, seems to aim with the whole strength of his body at cutting down. this branch; upon the plat-band or upper border is engraved ESVS. The greatest part of our antiquarians suppose, without proving it, that the Hervis of the Celts is the god Mars of the Romans: the authorities of Lucan and Lactantius, which they quote on the subject, do not assert it." The gaudensque feris altaribus Ilesus, of. the former, and Hesum atque Teuthaten humane cruore "' The egg was considered by the. ancients as the firvt principle of every thing, and has been made to play a mysterious part in almost all the ancient religions. The Persians still celebrate the feast of the new year, which falls on the 20th of March, by presenting to each other two colored eggs; and at the same period we give red eggs to our children, called Easter eggs, to give Easter eggs, etc. placant, of the latter, do not point out Mars; but he does not speak of Hesus: and, moreover, he attributes to the Gauls the worship of all the other gods of the Romans; upon which account, his testimony seems to require...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236739957
  • 9781236739957