Museum Disneianum, Being a Description of a Collection of Ancient Marbles, Specimens of Ancient Bronze, and Various Ancient Fictile Vases, in the Possession of John Disney; At the Hyde, Near Ingatestone

Museum Disneianum, Being a Description of a Collection of Ancient Marbles, Specimens of Ancient Bronze, and Various Ancient Fictile Vases, in the Possession of John Disney; At the Hyde, Near Ingatestone

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ...the hinder paws cross over the hips and meet in the front of the right thigh. He is supposed to be returning fi'om one of his labours: the exquisite expression of fatigue and lassitude is quite striking--dragging one leg after another, as if hardly capable of proceeding; the left arm held out as if to balance a tottering walk, and open hand, express so strongly this feeling, that when my fi'iend, Mr. James Christie, saw it, he said, "Admirable! I never " saw a piece of tired bronze before." The style of workmanship is coarse and bold, and induced a belief that this is a hasty sketch, or ebauche, of some Skllfill artist, to work out a first thought. There is a bronze figure of Hercules in Caylus's book, where the 1ion's skin is disposed in much the same way; but the attitude is different: it is engraved in his Recherch., vol. I., plate xxii. Of the lion's skin see Smith's Rom. Antq., Arma. There is another also in Millengen's Vases, plate xxxiii. Mr. Flaxman, Combe, and others, concurred in the character above-stated of this little figure. " I cannot admit this figure to be antique; it is probably not " older than the beginning of the XVIth century. It has much " the appearance of having been originally intended for a figure " of Christ bearing the cross, and afterwards converted into a " Hercules."--E. H. It is but fair to say, that I cannot by any means concur with my friend Hawkins respecting this figure. How the head can ever have been meant for Jesus Christ, when the lion's skin is so closely fitted to it, I leave those to determine who are better acquainted with this sort of metamorphose. My conviction goes entirely with the authorities...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236762517
  • 9781236762511