The Murder of Edwin Drood; Recounted by John Jasper Being an Attempted Solution of the Mystery Based on Dickens' Manuscript and Memoranda

The Murder of Edwin Drood; Recounted by John Jasper Being an Attempted Solution of the Mystery Based on Dickens' Manuscript and Memoranda

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...Jealousy. See above. Crisparkle's present candour to Jasper is thus traduced by Jasper to Rosa six months later on. "It was hawked through the late enquiries by Mr. Crisparkle that Landless had confessed to him that he was a rival of my lost boy." 16 This Unlooked for Declaration. Neville's love for Rosa was news to Jasper and news of dreadful import to each of them. Jasper made it thenceforth the one object of his wasted life to purge upon the gallows the inexpiable offence of Neville in loving Rosa. The disclosure turned Jasper pale and instantly induced a second rapid change of plan. Jasper could no longer support the absconding theory. He must stand out for murder at the hands of Neville. Hence his "sanguine reaction" is straight-way watered down and made dependent on the non-finding of any trace of Edwin. Steps are then taken by Jasper to secure that such traces shall be found. stretch of possibility the idea that he might have absconded of his own wild will. Now it fell out that Mr. Crisparkle going away from this conference still very uneasy in his mind took a memorable night walk.17 He walked to Cloisterham Weir. He often did so, and consequently there was nothing remarkable in his footsteps tending that way. But the preoccupation of his mind so hindered him from planning any walk, or taking heed of the objects he passed that his first consciousness of being near the Weir was derived from the sound of the falling water close at hand. "How did I come here?" was his first thought as he stopped. "Why did I come here?" was his second. Then he stood intently listening to the water. A familiar passage in his reading about airy tongues that syllable men's names18 rose so unbidden to his ear that he put it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236524640
  • 9781236524645