Munimenta Gildhallae Londoniensis; Liber Albus, Liber Custumarum, Et Liber Horn. Liber Custumarum with Extracts from the Cottonian Ms. Claudius, D. II Volume 2, No. 2

Munimenta Gildhallae Londoniensis; Liber Albus, Liber Custumarum, Et Liber Horn. Liber Custumarum with Extracts from the Cottonian Ms. Claudius, D. II Volume 2, No. 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...is mentioned as 'thynne lynnen;' but the latter term may possibly mean no more than 'material for 'lining, ' for which purpose both linen and thin silk were used. In Hall's Union (1548), mention is made of men ' apareled in silke 'sendall.' 'Her gonfainoun was of cendel Ynde, ' Arthour and Merlin, p. 209, probably blue silk. See Cindatum, and Cindon. cep. Fr. A pair of stocks (150); or possibly, in the present instance, merely a prison. It seems doubtful whether this word is derived from the Latin 'cippus, ' stocks, or from the A. S. cepan, 'to hold' or ' take.' In the Dictionary of J. de Garlande (Wright's Vol. Vocab. p. 131) we find it stated 'Cippus est quilibet truncus, et specialiter truncus ille quo crura 'latronum coarctantur, Gallice, 'cep.' Thorpe (Ancient Laws and Institutes of England, Glossary) says that in that work tho A. S. terms ' ceac' and 'ceap ' seem used indiscriminately for a kind of fetter in which the feet of the criminal were confined; but it appears not improbable that there was a distinction, and that in the former word we may detect the origin of the cucking-stool, which at an early period had the form of a close-stool, and indeed in Domesday, i. fol. 262 b, is called 'eathe'dra stercoris;' being so named, perhaps, from the A. S. 'cac' (stercus), of which 'ceac' may have been a variation. From 'cep' probably was derived the word 'ceper, ' meaning the keeper of a prison, and used in the Norman Version of the (so-called) Laws of William the Conqueror, given in the History of Ingulfus (Vol. I. Rer. Angl. Scriptores, Oxon. 1684). For a full account of this punishment in mediaeval times, see Roquefort, Gloss, de la Lang. Rom. s. v. Cep, and Du Cange, Glossar. s. v. Cippus. Cere. A hamlet in the County of Buckingham. (463.)...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 172 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 318g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236585801
  • 9781236585806