Municipal Ordinances, Rules and Regulations Pertaining to Public Health Adopted from January 1, 1910 to June 30, 1911, by Cities of the United States Having a Population of Over 25,000 in 1910

Municipal Ordinances, Rules and Regulations Pertaining to Public Health Adopted from January 1, 1910 to June 30, 1911, by Cities of the United States Having a Population of Over 25,000 in 1910

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...by having no stable, barnyard, pile of manure, or other source of contamination located within 200 feet of it. Amended and adopted by the board of health of the department of health April 13, 1910. Milk--Rules And Regulations Which Must Be Observed By Those Operating Creameries And Stations Shipping Milk For Use In New York City. Building. 1. The creamery and premises surrounding the same must be kept clean and free from accumulation of waste, rubbish, or offensive material. 2. Living quarters should not be located in the creamery building, and no living quarters must at any time be directly connected with any room in which milk is exposed or handled. Milk rooms. 3. The creamery must be provided with a receiving room, separated from the main milk-handling room. The place where cans, bottles, and utensils are washed should be distinct and separate from any place where milk is handled, and if connected, the doors must be arranged so as to close automatically. 4. The milk-handling room must be well supplied with natural light. Windows should be fitted with adjustable sashes, and all windows must be washed and kept clean. Such rooms must be kept clean and used exclusively for handling milk, and must in no case be used for the purpose of manufacturing cheese, casein, or other by-products, and must be separated from place where engine, boilers, or wash vats are located. 5. All rooms should be fitted with ventilating flues extending to the outside air, sufficient in size to carry off all odors, steam, or foul air. Outside dust should be prevented from entering the room where milk is handled. No rubbish or material not used in the handling of milk shall be allowed to accumulate. 6. The walls and ceilings of all rooms must be sheathed or ceiled....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 178 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236847903
  • 9781236847904