Mr. Greeley's Letters from Texas and the Lower Mississippi; To Which Are Added His Address to the Farmers of Texas, and His Speech on His Return to New York, June 12, 1871

Mr. Greeley's Letters from Texas and the Lower Mississippi; To Which Are Added His Address to the Farmers of Texas, and His Speech on His Return to New York, June 12, 1871

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1871 edition. Excerpt: ...State is " The International," Which is to connect at Fulton, Arkansas, on her north-eastern border, with one from Cairo, 111., and thus with Chicago and New York, running diagonally through Texas from north-east to south-west, crossing the Southern Pacific and "The Great Northern" near Tyler, the " Texas Central" at Hearne, and thence pushing straight for Austin, the capital, and hence to San Antonio, and so to the Bio Grande not far from Laredo. This road, though begun last November at Heame, where it crosses the " Texas Central," and impeded by the necessity of importing Corn at a cost of 2.10 per bushel and Hay at $85 per I TEXAS AS A LAND OF PROMISE. %& tun for its oxen and mules, has been pushed right vigorously in, either direction, and will have crossed both the Brassos and Col-orado, and reached Austin on the one hand, the Trinity on the other, by next May. Two years hence, it will have been completed from Fulton to San Antonio (400 miles), $nd will then have brought the heart of this State within four days' travel of the. Commercial Emporium, where it will be known as one of the most judicious and successful railway enterprises ever planned. It will carry more Beef Cattle than any road on the globe, and it will bring into Texas more immigrants than railroad ever carried into any State till now. I close with a single instance of the spirit in which our Northern railroad-builders are met by the people of Texas. The Legislature having granted a liberal subsidy in State Bonds to the Southern Pacific Road, Gov. Davis felt constrained to veto the bill. The Legislature thereupon repassed it by a vote of seven or eight to one in either House; and the Democratic vote in the affirmative was, I like the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123659696X
  • 9781236596963