Morals. Translated from the Greek by Several Hands. Corr. and REV. by William Goodwin, with an Introd. by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Morals. Translated from the Greek by Several Hands. Corr. and REV. by William Goodwin, with an Introd. by Ralph Waldo Emerson

By (author) 

List price: US$28.36

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...sent by Sylla lieutenantgeneral into Sicily, and being told that the soldiers turned out of the way and forced and plundered the country, he sealed the swords of such as he sent abroad, and punished all other stragglers and Wanderers. He had resolved to put the Mamertines, that were of the other side, all to the sword; but Sthenius the orator told him, He would do injustice if he should punish many that were innocent for the sake of one that was guilty; and that he himself was the person that persuaded his friends and forced his enemies to side with Marius. Pompey admired the man, and said, he could not blame the Mamertines for being inveigled by a person who preferred his country beyond his own life; and forgave both the city and Sthenius too. When he passed into Africa against Domitius and overcame him in a great battle, the soldiers saluted him Imperator. He answered, he could not receive that honor, so long as the fortification of the enemy's camp stood undemolished; upon this, although it rained hard, they rushed on and plundered the camp. At his return, among other courtesies and honors wherewith Sylla entertained him, he styled him The Great; yet when he was desirous to triumph, Sylla would not consent, because he was not yet chosen into the senate. But when Pompey said to those that were about him, Sylla doth not know that more worship the rising than the setting sun, Sylla cried aloud, Let him triumph. Hereat Servilius, one of the nobles, was displeased; the soldiers also withstood his triumph, until he had bestowed a largess among them. But when Pompey replied, I would rather forego my triumph than flatter them, --Now, said Servilius, I see Pompey is truly great and worthy of a triumph. It was a custom in Rome, that knights who...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 166 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 308g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236856325
  • 9781236856326