Moral Luck

Moral Luck

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Description

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Moral luck is a cognitive bias whereby a moral agent is assigned moral blame or praise for an action or its consequences even though it is clear that said agent did not have full control over either the action or its consequences. This term, introduced by Bernard Williams, has been developed, along with its significance to a coherent moral theory, by Williams and Thomas Nagel in their respective essays on the subject. Broadly speaking, human beings tend to correlate, at least intuitively, responsibility and voluntary action. Thus, the most blame is assigned to persons for their actions and the consequences they entail when we have good cause to believe that both, the action was performed voluntarily and without outside coercion, the agent understood the full range of the consequences of his decisions and actions, as could have reasonably been foreseen either at or prior to the time that the action was performed.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 4mm | 113g
  • Loc Publishing
  • United States
  • English
  • 6136627817
  • 9786136627816