Moose-Hunting, Salmon-Fishing and Other Sketches of Sport; Being the Record of Personal Experiences of Hunting Wild Game in Canada

Moose-Hunting, Salmon-Fishing and Other Sketches of Sport; Being the Record of Personal Experiences of Hunting Wild Game in Canada

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ..."What's that?" "Am going to tie this piece of board to the rod to keep it up, then fasten the line so it won't run out and throw the rod over." As it seemed feasible, S. accepted the plan, and they did it. So soon as the rod was directly below the slab, it held for a moment, then swung down the stream in line where they knew the fish must be, so, taking up the rod and freeing it from its encumbrances, he began to reel up the line, and found the salmon all right. So, without any further mishap, they soon had him in the boat. I had been a witness of all this manoeuvring, but was fast to a wild and stubborn fellow my self, so could not go to their assistance. S., in telling me about the spree, remarked there was more fun and sport in the capturing of that one than in all the others combined. There was nothing out of the common with the others, but with that fellow there was something new cropping up all the time, requiring the exercise of one's wits to straighten out. I spoke of being fast to a fifteen-pounder at the same time that S. was having his fun. My fish took under water, and, as soon as he found himself fast, began racing. Sometimes he would come so close, my gaff was in my hand to use, then he would sail away 60 or 70 yards, with the reel buzzing, and follow this by working up stream above the boat, worrying me with the prospect of shooting under the mooring. Then down he would come, aiming right for me, but fighting shy so soon as he sighted the boat. However, I knew he could not keep the racing up long with the tension upon him, and must soon give in, which he did, after running 20 yards or so across the stream. For a person alone in the boat, much the safest and easiest way is to work the fish up the stream above...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236527119
  • 9781236527110