Monumental Brasses and Slabs; An Historical and Descriptive Notice of the Incised Monumental Memorials of the Middle Ages with Numerous Illustrations

Monumental Brasses and Slabs; An Historical and Descriptive Notice of the Incised Monumental Memorials of the Middle Ages with Numerous Illustrations

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...for having their long flowing hair surmounted by tall conical caps, rarely seen in brasses, but commonly delineated in cotemporary illuminations, and still retained in use by the peasantry of Normandye. Of the head-dress generally worn during the latter part of the reign of Henry VII., and which continued in fashion for some time subsequent to the accession of his successor, we have characteristic specimens in the brasses bearing the dates A.D. 1514, 1516, 1527, and 1532, and which severally commemorate Margaret Pettwode, in St. Clement's church, Norwich, Jane Sylan, at Luton, Bedfordshire, Lady Leigh, at Winwick, Lancashire, and the wife of Robert Goodwyn, at Necton, in Norfolk: this is the angular or pedimental head-dress, well known from its association with the various historical portraits of that important era: it was composed of velvet or embroidered cloth, and sometimes of lighter materials, and being pointed somewhat stiffly over the. Heed.WifeofrlohertGoodwyn, forehead, descended in lappets upon the Ad-"as, oMocnuroh. Norfolk, shoulders and back. To this succeeded the peculiar coiffure identified with our reminiscences, and indeed with the very name, of Jane Sylan, A D IMS. Margaret Pettwode, A.D. 1314. St Clement's Church, Norwich. e " The peasantry of Rouen, Caen, Caux, &c., to this day wear the identical steeple-caps with the butterflies' wings that, three hundred and sixty years ago, towered upon the heads of the gentle dames of Paris and London. The eva nescent caprice of some high-born lkir has given a national costume to the paysannes of Normandy, who have reverendly copied for nearly four centuries the headdress worn by their mothers before them." Planche's British Costume, p. 208. Mary Stuart, the hapless...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236506464
  • 9781236506467
  • 2,277,114