Montrose and Covenanters; Their Characters and Conduct, Illustrated from Private Letters and Other Original Documents Hitherto Unpublished, Embracing the Times of Charles the First, from the Rise of the Troubles in Scotland, to the Death

Montrose and Covenanters; Their Characters and Conduct, Illustrated from Private Letters and Other Original Documents Hitherto Unpublished, Embracing the Times of Charles the First, from the Rise of the Troubles in Scotland, to the Death

By (author) 

List price: US$42.78

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1838 edition. Excerpt: ...affecting the Throne itself, as well as the liberty and lives of various noblemen and gentlemen, but simply as one of " the Plotters," or rather as King's evidence against them and the King. Then the cool effrontery of the Scotch Commissioners, --who in their hearts believed the King, and knew that the informer was a rogue, --is certainly unparalleled in any age of faction, when they say, after stating the contradiction which the evidence had met with from his Majesty and Traquair, --" but it is not likely that Lieutenant-Colonel Walter Stewart, his relation to the Earl of Traquair being considered, would to his prejudice have invented them." At the opening of the present Parliament an attempt was made, both by the King and Traquair, to remove this stumbling-block in the way of peace. Dunfermline and Loudon were commanded by his Majesty to present to the Parliament Traquair's submission, which that nobleman had laid before the King, who kept the original in his own possession, sending a copy to the Parliament, with this message, that his Majesty."would, if acceptable, transmit the original. In that paper, Traquair submits himself to the House with all possible respect, and expresses unfeigned regret that any statements or actions of his should have given discontent to the Parliament of Scotland, and he concludes by expressing his willingness to withdraw himself from Court, and from all public employments, until the King and the Parliament demanded his services again. Dunfermline and Loudon exhibited this submission to the Parliament, saying, that "if the same were acceptable, as they hoped it would, the principal would be sent in all haste, and that if they would grant his Majesty's desire he would take it as a very...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 354 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 630g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123659262X
  • 9781236592620