Money Is Power; A Scientific, Historic, and Practical Treatise on the Subject of Finance, with Sixty Statistical Tables Illustrative of the History and Pointing the Arguments Embraced in the Work. Also, a Review of Authors

Money Is Power; A Scientific, Historic, and Practical Treatise on the Subject of Finance, with Sixty Statistical Tables Illustrative of the History and Pointing the Arguments Embraced in the Work. Also, a Review of Authors

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...and deficient money. It is from such a deficiency that mankind are now suffering, and it is the actual and present evil with which we have to deal. From David Hume's Essay on Money: "It is certain that since the discovery of the mines in America industry has increased in all the nations of Europe. We find that in every kingdom into' which money begins to flow in greater abundance than; formerly, everything takes a new face; labor and industry gain life; the merchant becomes more enterprising, -the manufacturer more diligent and skillful, and even the farmer follows his plow with greater alacrity and attention. The good policy of the magistrate consists only in keeping it, if possible, still increasing; because by that means he keeps alive a spirit of industry in the nation and increases the stock of labor, in which consists all real power and riches. A nation whose money decreases is actually at that time weaker and more miserable than another nation which possesses no more money, but is on the increasing hand." Alexander Hamilton, in his report (1791) on the mint, says: "To annul the use of either of the metals as money is to abridge the quantity of circulating medium, and is liable to all the objections which arise from a comparison of the benefits of a full with the evils of a scanty circulation." William H. Crawford, Secretary of the Treasury, in a report (February 12th, 1820), to Congress, says: "All intelligent writers on currency agree that when it is decreasing in amount, poverty and misery must prevail." Mr. R. M. T. Hunter, in a report (1852) to the United States Senate, says: "Of all the great effects produced upon human society by the discovery of America, there were probably none so marked as...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236809327
  • 9781236809322