The Monetary Revolution; An Advance in the Philosophy and Science of Money. Adapted to a Republican Form of Government and Sovereignty in the People

The Monetary Revolution; An Advance in the Philosophy and Science of Money. Adapted to a Republican Form of Government and Sovereignty in the People

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ...' measure. The standard, being established, had a certain relation to labor and the products of labor and to debts and taxation, and if the market value of the metals afterward parted company from the standard dollar that had been eliminated from these metals at a certain time the standard dollar cannot follow either, but must be established on some other plan, as it will be found that we can have but one standard from which to establish the dollar which becomes the measure of all commercial value. The dollar, then, must itself be an unvarying measure and cannot follow the fluctuations of any metal that is entirely beyond public control, that is cornered and held for speculative purposes by bankers and money-lenders and to the detriment and danger of the people. To allow any form of bank paper to receive the government stamp of the dollar is an error. The government has the sole and exclusive right to the use and benefit of the monetary stamp, which is a national franchise, the use of which cannot, according to the constitution, be given to corporations or persons. It is an error to allow corporations or persons to take interest on money, because money is a national franchise and interest on money is taxing the individual for the use of the national franchise. The right to tax the people for the use of a national franchise alone rests in the government, therefore all interest on money should be paid to the government and prohibited to all others. 1. The bankers; notes (debts) used for s medium of exchange, as money is the source of revenue for the national banker and the means of taxing the people by interest. Legislative or principal department of overnment, run chiefly to make laws favorable to the money power being under their control....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236830091
  • 9781236830098