Monasticon Anglicanum; A History of the Abbies and Other Monasteries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches, with Their Dependencies, in England and Wales

Monasticon Anglicanum; A History of the Abbies and Other Monasteries, Hospitals, Frieries, and Cathedral and Collegiate Churches, with Their Dependencies, in England and Wales : Also of All Such Scotch, Irish, and French Volume 6, No. 3

By (author) 

List price: US$21.91

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ...I. to the tenants of the said canons, granted free of shyres, hundreds, wards, and all pleas, as also of sac, soc, toll, tem, and infangenethef, and other exactions and quarrels, except murder and theft a proved. " Thus, after the foundation and endowment of this co ege with lands, it was inhabited and governed by the secular canons till the monastery of South Ousiiey was erected, which was the full space of fifty-five years," and then they were, bv Robert Doilly, the second of that name, and nephew to Robert Doilly, the founder of this lace, translated from hence, with all their lands, to Ousney, Sulfri us de Ivery confirming the same, and became regular canons, learning the example from those of St. Frideswide's priory, who a little before had showed them the way. " Having now spoken of this place while it was ossessed by the seculars, we must proceed to tell you what is memorab e of it when it came, immediately after, to be possessed by scholars of the university, who were, as I find, of several sorts, as now in the colleges, as appears by the statutes of this college, where there is mention made of custos, socii, or sacerdotes, scholares, at commensales, that is, warden, fellows, or riests, scholars, and commoners. The custos or warden was always to e one of the canons of Ousney (to whom this lace did belong), who, though he did not always reside here, yet he ad his deputy to perform lns ofiice in his absence, and once in a week, or sometimes more, would commonly lodge here to see good orders observed; and as often that it happened so between the Nativity and Epiphany, the scholars, having notice of it, would, after supper, go to Ousney, and there wait till such time as he came out into the court, and being come...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 736 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 37mm | 1,293g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236915771
  • 9781236915771