The Modern Receipt Book; Being a Collection of Nearly Eight Hundred Valuable Receipts, Arranged Under Their Respective Heads

The Modern Receipt Book; Being a Collection of Nearly Eight Hundred Valuable Receipts, Arranged Under Their Respective Heads

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ... that season, infested with them. A pound of sulphur will clean as many trees as grow on several acres. Another method is to boil together a quantity of rue, wormwood, and common tobacco (of each equal parts), in common water. The liquid should be very strong-. Sprinkle this on the leaves and young branches every morning and evening during the time the fruit is ripening. To protect orchards from insects. Orchards are occasionally much injured, by an insect appearing like a white efflorescence; when bruised between the fingers, it emits a blood-red fluid. To prevent this, mix a quantity of cow dung with urine, tothe consistence of paint, and let the infected trees be anointed with it, about the beginning of March. To prevent the canker in apple trees. The only method of preventing the canker worm, which destroys the young fruit, and endangers the life of the tree, is to encircle the tree, about knee high, with a streak of tar, early in the spring, and occasionally to add a fresh coat. To cleanse old orchard trees. The use of lime is highly recommended in the dressing of old moss-eaten orchard trees. Take some fresh-made lime; slake it well with water, and dress the trees well with a brush, when the insects and moss will be destroyed. The outer rind will fall off, and a new, smooth, clear, healthy one be formed: the trees, although twenty years old, assuming a most healthy appearance. To prevent gumming in fruit trees. Take of horse dung any quantity; mix it well up with a quantity of clay and a litle sand, then add a quantity of pitch tar, (what is put upon cart-wheels), and form a wettish composition of the whole. In the spring of the year, after the fruit trees are cleared and tied up, cover their trunks and stems completely over with this...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236600061
  • 9781236600066