Modern Philosophers; Lectures Delivered at the University of Copenhagen During the Autumn of 1902, and Lectures on Bergson, Delivered in 1913

Modern Philosophers; Lectures Delivered at the University of Copenhagen During the Autumn of 1902, and Lectures on Bergson, Delivered in 1913

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ... of his soul, but his antipathy to the mean and weak, and his contempt of them overpowered, or rather hypnotised him, and the consequence was that the thing for which he set out to fight retired before that which he wished to combat. "Reactive" humours--which he despised so much in others--always won the upper hand in him. He himself felt his intellectual peril. In 1874 he wrote to Fraulein von Meysenbug, "How glad I should be to have cast out of myself all the negative and revolting that stays within me; yet I dare hope that in about five years I shall approach this high aim." This hope was not fulfilled, even after he had begun to work out the positive statement of his ideas. Even in the last years before the misfortune he interrupted his coherent labour in order to air his antipathies, although he had ventilated them often enough before. The predominant place taken by antipathies in his works is opposed, not only to his enthusiasm, but also to his affectionate and cordial disposition, as expressed in his most intimate relations. He himself, too, felt this. In a letter to Fraulein von Meysenbug (1875) he says: "This autumn I undertook to begin every morning by asking, 'Is there no one to whom thou couldest do some good to-day?'... With my writings I cause chagrin to many; so that I ought to try and make it good somehow." Some years later he wrote to Erwin Rhode that he was still aware that the picture which his books gave of him (he was then at the height of his polemic writing) did not agree with the picture which his friend carried in his heart. He had really " another nature" (than that which was expressed in his writings at this time); with the "first" he would have been ruined long...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236844114
  • 9781236844118