Modern Machine Shop Tools, Their Construction, Operation and Manipulation, Including Both Hand and Machine Tools; A Book of Practical Instruction

Modern Machine Shop Tools, Their Construction, Operation and Manipulation, Including Both Hand and Machine Tools; A Book of Practical Instruction

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...In Fig. 388 is shown a standard modern planer. The bed is deep and heavy with the work table moving in inverted vees. The housings or uprights are secured firmly to the bed and crosstied at the top. The cross rail is gibbed to the front of the housings and carries the tool head. The cross rail is adjustable vertically, being operated by the two elevating screws, by hand on the smaller machines, and by power on the larger ones. On the large machines, two heads are frequently used on the cross rail and one on the face of each housing, thus enabling several cuts to be taken on the work at the same time. The important features of the planer are its table driving mechanism including reversing gear and the mechanism for operating the feeds. In some of the earlier planers the table was driven by a quick-pitch screw with suitable gears and pulleys at the end of the bed. This method has been entirely replaced by the rack and fig. 388. gear drive and the Sellers or spiral gear drive. In Fig. 389 is shown the gear arrangement as commonly used in the rack and-gear drive. The rack A is secured to the bottom of the table. The gear B meshes with the rack and is driven from the pulley C through the gear reductions E F and B H. D and I are loose pulleys carrying belts that run in opposite directions. When the belt running in the direction of the arrow is on the pulley C the table and work move toward the tool, and when the reverse belt is thrown upon C the table moves the work away from the tool. The backing belt is usually driven at about four times the velocity of the forward belt, thus giving the table what is termed a quickreturn motion. The object of this is to get the table and work back and ready for another cut with the least possible loss of time. As...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 132 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236555686
  • 9781236555687