Modern Foundry Practice; Dealing with the Green-Sand, Dry-Sand and Loam Moulding Process the Materials Used Also Detailed Descriptions of the Machinery and Other Appliances Employed, with Pracitical Examples and Rules, Including Volume 1

Modern Foundry Practice; Dealing with the Green-Sand, Dry-Sand and Loam Moulding Process the Materials Used Also Detailed Descriptions of the Machinery and Other Appliances Employed, with Pracitical Examples and Rules, Including Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... the blocks when rammed, than to pick out the pattern from the face of the mould as in the ordinary process. The whole being in one solid mass in this plan, it can be lifted more steadily, with less risk of injury to the sand mould. When the pattern is long and very thin and intricate, as in the case of an ornamental fender-front, where the general surface is also curved or winding, as in Fig. 146, the difficulty of picking out the pattern from the mould is so great as to require the most skilful workmen, and the length of time required for repairing the injuries of the mould causes about eight sets of fender castings a day to be the general limit to the number that can be moulded by each man and boy. But however difficult the pattern may be to mould in the ordinary way, if it is arranged to "draw" properly from the mould with this process, the labour is very little greater than with an easy pattern; the saving of time is so great that as many as thirty a day are moulded on an average by one labourer and a boy, being four times the number that the best moulders can produce by the ordinary plan. Fw. 146. When the pattern is slender and long, it is liable to be broken in the frequent handling to which it is subject in the ordinary process of moulding, and the expense and delay caused by the breakage of patterns is of serious consequence in light ornamental work, where the patterns are often very expensive; but in this plan such defects are entirely avoided, the pattern is never handled at all, except by the ordinary process of moulding to form the ramming blocks. When the face of the castings is required to be particularly well finished, a brass or other metal pattern is made, and is dressed up and finished to the degree that may be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 230 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 417g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236576969
  • 9781236576965